Thursday, November 20, 2008

In defense of "Modern Art" One of It's father's Goya:"Perro semi- hundido".


One of the few truly original works of art. Without getting into any "artspeak" that can quickly become pompas, I would like to point out how amazing it is that such an early artist conveys so much emotion with his use of brooding sentimental color, vast empty plains of space, and the center placement of just the dogs head. You ache for this abandoned dog. This dog who you feel has just appeared to have realized he is alone in the world. Fearful and paranoid. Something the great Goya himself surely was familar with. Later in his life he was tourtured with migraines,tinnitus and severe depression, Many thought him a madman as they thought evidenced by his works such as Saturn Devouring His Children. What I choose to believe is that art is not to be judged, or challenged or used to make anyone feel superior or insecure about ones self or intellect. Art is something the artist must do. A release that will not be denied. For the viewer it is to evoke an emotion or a reaction. Whether that is pain, or joy. What I think often gets over looked with modern art, is that the viewer is asked to do some of the work. In other words, bring some of their own emotions to the table. This does not always have to be a heavy meal of abandonment as in Perro semi-hundido. It can be wit, or sarcasm or even silly, like Mole Men Leaving Laundry In The Field.

7 comments:

Eva said...

At the risk of sounding boring, I would like to say that I love Goya. That painting leaves me breathless and I keep hoping that the dog will get out of it alive (unless it's a giant poodle but that is an altogether different business)...

And for the record, I take Mole Men very seriously.

Beverly Hamilton Wenham said...

I just adore you! Thanks!
I love Goya too. This is a odd one for a guy who did such vastly diverse work. I thought it was a good one for my point. In truth I like to think that the dogs owner is just in a shop getting take home empanadas,(of which he has bought an extra for his favorite dog) and will be right out and take his doggie home. Later to give him a big soup bone for being so good while he waited.

Ana said...

Well said, Bev.

I wasn't familiar with this painting (which shouldn't be surprising as I'm no Goya expert by any means). If it weren't for the title, I see it as a dog swimming up a giant wave, entirely alone, bent on his own survival. I think this proves your point.

Eva said...

Yes, your comment reassured me. With my weird cravings of the moment, I think I would fancy an empanada and a bit of that soup bone. That picture now looks less depressing because we now know the outcome for sure.

Eva said...

NOOOO!!!!! I've just noticed that you had added a new and intriguing entry to your blog and when I clicked to see it I got a message telling me that it couldn't be found!!!! The title was so intriguing that it pushed me to write this very desperate looking message... Why deprive us of skeleton related activity? Why?!

Im HOT said...

I'd have liked the painting a whole lot if the dog was a sheep. My sheep get real lonely out in the field sometimes when they get broken from the flock. When dat happens either me or my dog brings 'm back.

Real sorry to hear about Goya going loco. Was he a friend of yours?

Beverly Hamilton Wenham said...

He was a friend to all of us. Maybe, not one we would wanna go to dinner with, but a hoot all the same.

My in-laws raise sheep. Not their children. Actual sheep. Well, not all their children.